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Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

By: Anonymous

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Month, a time to learn about and celebrate the rich histories and cultures of Americans from the Asian continent and the Pacific Islands. The AAPI population is remarkably diverse, with 24 million people tracing their roots to over 30 countries. Many different cultures mean many different beliefs and traditions regarding the passage from life to death.

Demographic research reveals that AAPI Americans are less likely to access hospice and palliative care than other groups. Asian Americans, for example, have been shown to use fewer end-of-life services. Studies attribute this to cultural beliefs, language barriers, attitudes about death, and family-centered decision-making. But good hospice and home care can meet these challenges.

Respecting Differences

We recognize that the AAPI community has diverse attitudes and practices surrounding illness, hospice, and death.

Although some AAPI practices are widely shared, such as respecting elders, using white and yellow colors, and burning incense, some practices vary. Chinese and Korean values can require the family to keep vigil by a dying loved one. The Chinese tradition, however, may maintain a hierarchy within the family structure, while the Korean tradition might maintain the division of genders. In other AAPI traditions, individuals, like expectant mothers, are discouraged from visiting someone at their end-stage of life for their own protection. In addition, some cultures place great value on a loved one being cared for in their own home at the end of their life.

Hospice of North Alabama understands that these spiritual practices can, and should be, honored. We’re here to accommodate by providing professional, competent, caring, in-home service that maintains sensitivity to these values. 

Personalized Care Informed by Cultural Respect

Care goes beyond medical support. We are prepared to and can help you and your family with the hospice and bereavement journey with sensitivity toward AAPI’s religious, spiritual, cultural, and personal beliefs. This respect extends beyond rites and rituals and into practical care. The Native Hawaiian belief that spiritual essence (mana) is in all parts of the body can, for example, influence feelings about organ donation or cremation. But awareness of this belief informs our good care for a Native Hawaiian in the end stage of life.

The AAPI population is growing. By 2050, AAPI will become nearly 10% of the total United States population. It’s important that they can get the end-of-life care they need. Our staff ensures that everyone in our care, their family, and their loved ones are treated with respect. 

Some Eastern philosophies view death as part of a cycle in which a loved one’s passage serves as a reminder to celebrate the miracle of life. Our team celebrates the lives of the people we care for, and what makes each of them unique. We’re proud to join this month’s celebration of Asian and Pacific Islander American Heritage Month. We invite interested AAPI Americans to learn about our hospice and in-home services, confident their culture and traditions will be honored.

Close up of hospital sign

On National Hospital Week and Every Week, We Thank You!

By: Anonymous

We invite all community members to join us to recognize National Hospital Week, May 8 to May 14, 2022. Here’s more about this yearly observance and how we honor it at Hospice of North Alabama.

What Is National Hospital Week?

National Hospital Week is observed every year during the week that includes May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Florence Nightingale is best known for founding modern professional nursing and demonstrating the importance of nurses and their roles in the healthcare community.

Established in 1953 by the American Hospital Association, National Hospital Week highlights and recognizes hospitals and healthcare workers and the many innovative ways they support their communities.

Thank You For All You Do

Our team understands how challenging and demanding the hospital setting can be. We want to thank physicians, nurses, social workers, discharge planners, aides, and all other clinical staff members who have supported and cared for our patients and communities over the past year, especially given the unique ongoing challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. Your hard work, long hours, and dedication to your communities have helped improve the quality of care for thousands of people in need.

Partnering With Hospice Care

As a leading hospice treatment provider, Hospice of North Alabama extends extra thanks to hospitals that partner with hospice providers. Your care and services have dramatically improved the quality of life for terminally ill patients and their families. In addition, you have given our team the opportunity to help these families save on hospital-related costs and deliver highly personalized care that helps them fulfill their loved ones’ final wishes.

We look forward to continuing our relationships with hospitals that partner with hospice treatment providers and are confident that together we can handle any unforeseen challenges that may come our way. In honor of National Hospital Week, thank you.

Elderly stroke patient and their caregiver

Hospice Eligibility for Stroke Patients

Some of the most common misconceptions about hospice care involve when it’s appropriate for a patient to elect hospice services and what diagnoses qualify a patient for hospice. People often assume hospice is only for cancer patients, but that is simply not true. You may be surprised to learn that stroke patients also qualify for hospice services.

What is a Stroke?

Strokes are the number five cause of death and a leading cause if disability in the United States. A stroke is defined as a disease that impacts the arteries leading to and within the brain. It occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or ruptures. When this happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, causing it and brain cells to die.

Stroke Warning Signs

The American Stroke Association uses F.A.S.T to help us identify warning signs of a stroke.

F = Face Drooping

If one side of the face is drooping or numb, this can be a common sign of a stroke. One way to help to determine this is by asking the person to smile. If their smile is uneven, that is an indication of face drooping caused by a stroke.

A = Arm Weakness

Another sign can be if one arm feels weak or numb. Ask the person to raise both their arms. If one arm drifts downward, it could be a sign of a stroke.

S = Speech Difficulty

Slurred speech is a third sign of a stroke.

T = Time to Call 911

If someone is showing these three warning signs of a stroke, call 911 immediately.

Other Signs and Symptoms

Other signs and symptoms of a stroke can include:

Stroke Risk Factors

Given the danger of strokes, it’s important to understand the different risk factors, including both those within and out of your control.

Risk Factors You Can Control

Some risk factors of stroke are within your control. These can include:

Risk Factors Beyond Your Control

As with anything else, some stroke risk factors are beyond your control. These can include:

Hospice Qualifiers

Hospice can benefit patients who are in the terminal stages of a stroke. The following criteria could be indicators that it may be a good time to consider the additional support of hospice.

If you are still unsure if your loved one qualifies for hospice, or if you have any questions about hospice for stroke patients, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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