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SHPBest

Hospice of North Alabama has earned the 2021 SHPBestTM “Superior Performer” Caregiver Satisfaction Award 

Huntsville, Alabama, 07/20/2022 – Hospice of North Alabama has been recognized by Strategic Healthcare Programs (SHP) as a “Superior Performer” for achieving an overall caregiver and family satisfaction score that ranked in the top 20% of all eligible SHP clients for the 2021 calendar year.

The annual SHPBest™ award program was created to acknowledge hospice providers that consistently provide high quality service to families and caregivers of patients receiving hospice care. The 2021 award recipients were determined by reviewing and ranking the overall CAHPS Hospice survey satisfaction score for more than 1,000 hospice providers. With one of the largest CAHPS Hospice benchmarks in the nation, SHP is in a unique position to identify and recognize organizations that have made family and caregiver satisfaction a priority and have been rewarded for their efforts with high marks on the CAHPS Hospice survey.

“SHP is proud to present the SHPBest awards to our top-performing customers. We commend these organizations for their continuous focus on delivering the highest quality of care to their patients”, said Rob Paulsson, President of SHP.

We are beyond grateful to have been honored with this award, and we owe it to our incredible team. These kind, compassionate individuals are committed to providing the highest quality care for our patients and their loved ones, and we are so proud to work alongside them each day.

Read more about the SHPBest awards program, including methodology and award recipient lists at https://www.shpdata.com/hospice/shpbest-cahps-hospice/.

SHPBest Certificate

Abode Hospice of North Alabama

Hospice of North Alabama provides a higher level of hospice care by providing premium comfort care, addressing individual needs, and utilizing a low patient/nurse ratio, allowing for more care time whenever needed.

Our mission is to provide premium comfort care to patients, families, and caregivers through an interdisciplinary team approach that understands, respects, and meets individual needs.

About Strategic Healthcare Programs (SHP)

Strategic Healthcare Programs (SHP) is a leader in data analytics and benchmarking that drive daily clinical and operational decisions. Our solutions bring real-time data to post-acute providers, hospitals, and ACOs to better coordinate quality care and improve patient outcomes. Since 1996, SHP has helped more than 7,000 organizations nationwide raise the bar for healthcare performance.

National Volunteer Month

Volunteers are an essential part of the hospice care team. The difference they make for our patients and their families is immeasurable. Whether it’s through direct care or administrative work behind the scenes, there are countless ways a hospice volunteer can help.

We are beyond grateful for the incredible people who volunteer their time and talents to make a positive difference in our patients’ lives. In honor of National Volunteer Month, we’d like to recognize just a few of them. We asked our volunteers to share what made them decide to be a hospice volunteer and what they find most rewarding about their experience.

Dennis

Hospice of the Midwest Volunteer – We Honor Veterans Program

Dennis

“On September 10, 2018, Mr. Kelly Gafkjen, Chaplain, Hospice of the Midwest, was a guest speaker at our Urbandale-Johnston Veterans of Foreign Wars monthly meeting. Kelly was on a mission seeking veterans to talk to veterans in local hospice care in their homes or hospice facilities.  Many veterans in hospice would like to share their life and military experiences, but feel only a fellow veteran can associate with their feelings. At the conclusion of his presentation, Kelly asked that we consider volunteering, receive some minimal training, and agree to talk to veterans who are seeking fellow veterans to talk to.  After our meeting concluded, a number of us discussed the information presented by Kelly, and three of us thought this was right in line with our VFW mission of “Veterans helping Veterans”.  Contact was made with Kelley and the three of us started our training at the Fall Training Session September 27, 2018 , conducted by Kelley and Taylor Schneider.  By the end of October we had finished our training and were waiting for our first assigned veteran. Under the guidance of Taylor I was introduced to my first veteran during a pinning ceremony on November, 30, 2018.  Since then I have had the privilege of meeting and sharing both civilian  and military experiences with 9 veterans of WW II, Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War eras.  Every veteran, whether Army, Air Force, Navy or Marine, were all comrades and had their own unique and fascinating stories to tell. Some sad, some humorous, but all seemed willing to share with enthusiasm. I so much enjoyed visiting with these men, and I only hope they felt the  same comradery that I felt while in their presence.  I will miss these veterans but look forward to meeting my next comrade.”

Arav and Anishka

Grane Hospice Volunteers

Arav and Anishka

“We started volunteering for a local hospice during the pandemic (2020). We stumbled upon the opportunity from an email our mom received asking for donations of homemade casseroles and cards for hospice patients and their families. At first, it started by making occasional cards and casseroles, and then it turned into a routine every other week activity. This evolved into helping other hospices including including Grane Hospice. We have made homemade cards and even have given a virtual concert for the patients at Grane Hospice. We feel grateful to be able to give back to others in need even during a worldwide pandemic. It shows no matter what the circumstances, we can help others in our community. All this volunteer work has inspired us to create our own non-profit group called Rays of Sunshine, benefiting local hospices. We hope to expand and help even more local hospices in the future.”

Daniel

CompassionCare Hospice Volunteer

Daniel

“Coming from a family where both parents were in the medical field, I have had an interest in medicine ever since I can remember. In the pursuit of getting involved with medical volunteering opportunities, I wanted to commit to something that would provide meaningful experiences in vulnerable people’s lives, as well as my own. Although my patients’ physical bodies are failing them, they still have great wisdom to impart when given the chance to share and be heard. Many times, I leave the local assisted living facility with an enlightened perspective that I believe will serve me well in the career I am aspiring to have. From hearing first-person stories of World War II experiences to celebrating 96 years of living, there is always a window for valuable learning opportunities when I have the chance to spend time with these folks whom I now consider my friends.”

Joan

AT Home Care and Hospice Volunteer

Joan

“I Prayed about being a Hospice Volunteer and this is how the Lord is using My ability as a Hairdresser, to bring Comfort and Joy to the Patients. The most rewarding aspect is seeing the Happiness in the Faces of the Patients and their Families. Working with Them is a Blessing to Me.”

Virginia and Flynn

Grane Hospice Volunteers

“Being a hospice volunteer is about having a passion and love for helping others. No, I don’t physically help them but the most rewarding part about volunteering with my dog, Flynn, is seeing the joy it brings to residents. Residents look forward to our visits and remember us from week to week, allowing special connections to be made. I’m thankful for the opportunity Flynn and I have to give our time and make people smile.”

Kennedi and Ernest

Hospice of North Alabama Volunteers

Kennedi and Ernest

Kennedi and Ernest – graduate level social work students with Alabama A&M University and the University of Alabama – are student volunteers with Hospice of North Alabama in Huntsville. They sit with patients to provide caregiver respite. Hospice volunteer work allows students to garner a strong understanding of how social workers broker services within a healthcare agency as well as how to coordinate with various other healthcare and social service agencies.

Ernest states “I have learned that the process of dying and bereavement is as diverse as the families we serve. The first step of serving this population is engaging the patient and/or caregivers on what they want this time in their lives to be like—no two answers are the same.”

Along with the home environment, they also work with residential care communities to provide comfort and support. This gives them experience working with diverse community types and medical care needs.

Kennedi states “The things I’ve learned while interning at Hospice of North Alabama have prepared me to be a more caring and competent social worker. The compassion and kindness that HNA shows to the patients has been extended to me from the very beginning, and I’m so grateful. This has been the greatest experience of service I have committed myself to.” Ernest agrees, adding: “Knowing that you have provided support to a patient and/or their family in this transition period is rewarding. Establishing the trust that fosters comfort and emotional resiliency is an experience that will give volunteers a unique understanding of how health care best serves patients in all life stages.”

Choi-ha

Premier Hospice Volunteer

“My internship and volunteering experience with Premier Hospice was meaningful and fulfilled my longstanding desire of working with end-of-life services to clients and their families. 

I enjoyed working with a well-resourced team that included a chaplain, bereavement coordinator, social workers, liaisons, nurses, a doctor, and a volunteer coordinator. Each of them brought to bear their own particular skillset, and we all collaborated to make our clients’ end of life as comfortable and dignified as possible. 

Besides teamwork, I enjoyed, I enjoyed visiting with my client once a week. My primary role was to support and strengthen the care providers so that they might function better.

I also enjoyed supporting other team members by making caring calls to clients or their families. It was amazing how much comfort and reassurance I could bring to them through the calling service. My participation in the online bereavement group was my gain in the understanding and knowledge of the process in group work, particularly for grieving families. 

Through my time with Premier Hospice, I have grown to better appreciate the important role of leadership in the hospice setting. The internship was profitable to my professional growth and development.”

Katie

Premier Hospice Volunteer

Katie

“I volunteer with hospice to facilitate new transitions. In January 2020, I completed the training to become an End-of-Life Doula in New York City. In my move to Indianapolis, it was important for me to find a strong hospice program where I could be actively involved in the moments of life and death with others.

I volunteer because dying is an important cycle in every community. It is never easy to participate in the dying process, it pulls at every piece of your being. But there is nothing more rewarding than helping a patient or caregiver smile again while recalling a significant life moment. There is nothing more rewarding when the world feels burdensome, to help others find peace even for a single second.”

Thank You, Volunteers!

Thank you to these incredible individuals – and to all the volunteers on our team – for all you do for our patients and their families. You are amazing!

Interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities at Hospice of North Alabama? We’d love to have you on our team! Learn more and apply here.

banner that reads 'What Black History Month Means to Me' alongside portrait of Angelique

What Black History Month Means to Me

By: Angelique Riley

Meet Angelique

My name is Angelique Riley, and I have been at Grane Hospice Care, King of Prussia (an Abode Healthcare and BrightSpring Health Services company), for a little over two and a half years. I joined Grane after spending twenty years managing Life Enrichment in Continuing Care Retirement Centers. I found Life Enrichment rewarding, but it was time to hang up that hat and move on to another venture.

I chose to work in Hospice Care to share my natural gift of helping people during the most difficult time of their lives. I take pride in sharing compassion, support, and a great deal of care with our patients. It is a great honor to be spotlighted in our employee newsletter, and to share what Black History Month means to me.

What Black History Month Means to Angelique

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States, where it is also known as African American History Month. It began as a way of remembering important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. Now that you have the Wikipedia definition of Black History Month; let me tell you what Black History Month really means…

Black History cannot be contained or limited to a single month. I grew up in a family where we honored and embraced our heritage year-round. My siblings and I were educated by our father on the rich history of African Americans. He taught us about inventors, writers, educators, musicians, and other notable Black figures.

It was important to my father that we had knowledge of our own history. We grew up as military children and were exposed to many different cultures and environments. My father prided himself in educating us on African American studies because he knew our schools and society, would more likely teach us an inaccurate version of our history, if they mentioned African Americans at all.

American schools teach students about Dr. Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks, and the enslavement of African American people in the US. Those are important topics to cover, but that barely scrapes the surface of African American contributions to our society. Sparse lesson plans fail to mention the large numbers of African American scientists, physicians, attorneys, and professors who have made huge contributions to American progress.

A Personal Story

A quick funny story: When I was in World History Class my junior year in High School in Lawton, Oklahoma, the teacher presented a lecture about religion in the African American community. I remember cringing in my seat, my spirit stirred with frustration because the lesson was filled with errors about my history and my culture. I could not remain silent.

Each time that the teacher mispronounced a name, gave an inaccurate date, or worse, attributed an accomplishment to the wrong person, I spoke up and corrected him. After I contradicted him four or five times, the teacher grew so frustrated that he shouted,

DO YOU WANT TO TEACH THE CLASS?”. I rose to my feet and said, “Yes, I do”.

It did not end well for me that day. I was sent to the office immediately and punished with an In-House Suspension. Despite the repercussions, I never regretted what I did.

My experience confirmed my father’s prediction that the school was not going to teach the proper information on African American History. Since my father took the time to teach me, I knew my history and had the conviction to share it with my peers.

I shared this story to illustrate the importance of teaching African American History and embracing it as an ongoing celebration in the African American Community. I am grateful to see schools, businesses and the community recognize Black History.

Black Is Love

The month of February is a time to honor our ancestors and their hidden or overlooked contributions. It is also a time to reflect on the work still to be done.

Black History Month is a reminder that Black Is Love. I love being an African American woman and getting to reflect with others who are also proud to be African American. Black History Month is an invitation for others to join in the ongoing celebration of black excellence. It is unity in its highest form.

What Hispanic Heritage Means to Me

As the end of National Hispanic Heritage Month grows near, we are shining a spotlight on Director of Business Development, Nereida. We asked her what Hispanic heritage means to her. Thank you, Nereida, for sharing your story with us!

Nereida’s Story

Hispanic/Latin/LatinX heritage and culture, to me, means family.

I was raised with a large, loving family. Food, music, and family created a sense of warmth, love, and good times. At the center of it all, our matriarch, my Abuela Juana. She moved to the United States from Puerto Rico in the 60’s. She was always in the service of others. From being a social worker to a home health aide, she was love, selflessness, and caregiving exemplified.

I became a nurse because of her. After her stroke, I experienced first-hand the weight of not having advance care planning in place. 9 children, 46 grandchildren and 40 great-grandchildren had to come together to make decisions on her behalf.

After a long illness, she needed hospice. Seeing how hospice allowed us to be family and experiencing that gift, I was drawn to hospice after 19 years of nursing.

My passion, drive, advocacy, and love for hospice is fueled by the love for and from my Abuela. I am honored to carry on her legacy in the service of others while assisting people and families at a pivotal moment in their lives.

A Music Therapy Case Study | Joshua Gilbert, MT-BC Throughout life, song can positively affect us both physically and emotionally. It influences bodily functions that we believe are beyond our control, such as heart rate, blood pressure and release of the body’s natural pain relief chemicals. Music therapy offers significant benefits for patients, caregivers and families. We offer it as part of our hospice services. In a case study conducted (by Joshua Gilbert) on the impact of music therapy over a four-month period, with an older adult in hospice care, results exhibited significant signs of improvement in the following categories: Through involvement in music-based interventions, these improvements allowed the patient to benefit from music therapy during hospice care. The patient often smiled, laughed and made positive comments about the music. After participating in deep breathing exercises and harmonica playing, the patient’s breathing became deeper and less labored. Additionally, the patient developed increased confidence in improvising harmonica music, and more open about expressing her emotions surrounding death. Despite patient status or level of consciousness, music therapists can console and comfort them through music. Research has shown hearing is the last outside sensation that registers with a dying patient. Let us help your loved one make this experience more soothing. To read the full case study, please click here.Hospice of North Alabama is celebrating nurses during the month of May! Meet Destin and learn about her passion for nursing as she explains her “why.” I believe I was called at a young age to become a hospice nurse. At 17, I lost my pawpaw to cancer. The hospice nurse was there through it all and provided so much comfort for my family and me. I craved to be that comfort for someone else. At the age of 21, I became an RN, and a year later I entered my dream job of being a hospice nurse. I have been doing it for 7 years since. I have been with HNA since 2016, and I could not imagine a better company to work for.” Destin adds at the end: “If you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life.” -Marc AnthonyHospice of North Alabama is celebrating nurses during the month of May! Meet Christy and learn about her passion for nursing as she explains her “why.” “I chose to be a nurse because I wanted to make a difference in this world. I always knew I wanted to help people as a little girl, and I enjoyed marking people smile. I also wanted to leave people better than I found them by making a positive impact on their lives. My goal was to make my Dad and the rest of family proud, so I became a Nurse to give back to the world!”Hospice of North Alabama is celebrating nurses during the month of May! Meet Adam and learn about his passion for nursing as he explains his “why.” “I became a nurse somewhat late in life, not going to nursing school until I was 34 years old. Prior to that, I grew up in a family of EMTs and firefighters, and some of my earliest memories were on medical and accident scenes, stuck in the car watching from the window of course. At the age of 17, I joined the military as an army combat medic and went to Iraq for 14 months running an ambulance. When I returned home, I was working as a medical assistant in an oncology practice. I decided to try something different and was out of the medical field for five years before deciding to go back to school.  This was the best decision I’ve ever made. I love helping people, solving problems and educating my coworkers, patients, and their families. After working in the ER and as a travel nurse for a few years, I had a friend with Hospice of North Alabama who told me about some openings. I thought I might enjoy this and liked the idea of using my nursing knowledge to help people in a very tough time and make an impact on how they experienced the dying process. So, I decided to give it a try and have loved every minute of it since. I truly enjoy caring for my patients and their families, along with the opportunity to educate people who are new to Hospice of North Alabama. I cannot see myself going anywhere other than hospice!”In her 8th year as an RN, Julie Doss of Hospice of North Alabama reflects on her journey towards becoming a nurse and all those who have influenced her along the way. In honor of National Nurses Week, we want to share Julie’s passion for hospice nursing and how her career choice has impacted her life. Julie always knew she wanted to be a nurse but was cautious because she thought her stomach couldn’t handle it, so she became a teacher instead. Even as a child, her mother told stories of her pretending to stick her dolls with sewing needles, as if she was administering an IV, and taking care of them like real patients. When her career of teaching pre-k abruptly came to an end, Julie saw the opportunity to pursue her dream of becoming a nurse. She arrived at this decision shortly after losing her grandfather. He suddenly became sick, and exploratory surgery revealed cancer that had metastasized throughout his whole body. The doctors announced he had seven days to live, and he was palliated in the hospital. During her grandfather’s seven days in hospice, Julie spent time keeping him calm and settled until he passed. Several weeks after his passing, Julie’s other grandfather was admitted into hospice care as well. For nearly a year, Julie helped take care of him during his time with hospice. With those experiences in mind, Julie thought, “If I could do those things for the people I loved most – some of those most private caregiving duties – I could do it for anyone.” As a result, she enrolled in a CNA program and worked nights at a nursing home for almost a year, while her husband worked hard to help put her through school. Her first job out of nursing school was working nights at a hospital in the neuro/ortho unit. While she loved this position, she couldn’t help but think of how highly her mother-in-law spoke of the hospice organization she worked for. With that in mind, along with her personal experiences, Julie knew that hospice nursing was her true calling. When a fellow church member reached out to Julie about working for Hospice of North Alabama, she jumped at the chance. “I thought I was going to be fired after my first day on the job. Two of my five patients passed away that day. Since then, I have grown and gotten to do many different things in my time with Hospice of North Alabama/Abode Healthcare. This is one-hundred percent because of the people who have supported me along the way, and my coworkers who have taught me so much and mentored me.” How Hospice Nursing Has Impacted Julie Not long after Julie became a hospice nurse, she had a patient with lung cancer who was declining rapidly. He was a minister with a very close-knit family. It was clear he was the rock of the family; the center of everything they did. Because of this, the family was taking the situation very hard. After being with the patient for nearly a month, February rolled around, and with it came a prediction of ice and snow. As the weather became increasingly worse, Julie received an upsetting call from the patient’s daughter, saying he was declining rapidly. After finding a safe means of transportation, Julie made her way to the family. When she arrived, she could sense the family was truly struggling. In the week before, Julie had talked with the family about how important it is for someone who is dying to have permission from their loved ones to let go. After getting the patient comfortable, the daughter came up to Julie and asked if it was time to do so. Julie then stood in the corner of the room and watched the family, one by one, sit on the man’s bedside and pour out their hearts by telling him how their lives were forever changed because of him. When it came time for his wife to say her goodbyes, she could hardly do it. She looked at Julie and she responded, “If all you need to do is lay with him, that is okay.” Then, the wife laid next to her husband, wrapped her arms around him, and whispered her love to him and how thankful she was for the family they created together. As she told him it was okay to go, he took one breath and was gone. “I will never forget experiencing this love of a family and what that means to people. I have cared for a lot of people and attended many deaths, but never have I heard regrets about money, work, etc.; all they talk about are people they love. This is such a great reminder of how you should live your life and what is truly important. There is not another job is this world that I would rather do than what I am doing right now – with the people I work with and the company I work for.” Julie & Hospice of North Alabama – Personal Testimony “We are incredibly blessed, here at Hospice of North Alabama, with a fantastic group of people whose mission in life is to make sure we take care of the patients who allow us into their homes, lives and hearts for whatever time they may have left. Hospice is not about dying, it is about living well for whatever time you have left. It is our job and privilege to help contribute to that.” “Through hospice nursing, Hospice of North Alabama and my coworkers, I have had some of the best experiences of my life. I have learned more about life, how to live and what’s important through this job that any other thing I could possibly do.” “When you work with people who are at the end of their life, and their families who are dealing with the loss of a loved one, you just learn so much about what is truly important. I have learned so much about forgiveness and the importance of the relationships in my life.” “One of the things that sets this organization apart is the staff here. I am just beyond amazed at how they love their patients, their jobs, and how they take care of one another. We have been able to do and see many wonderful things for patients that would not have had that opportunity without the help of the staff here.” Volunteers are an essential part of a hospice team, participating in roles from directly interacting with patients to helping with fundraising efforts. Hospice volunteers often describe their work as purposeful, validating, and meaningful. Hospice volunteers are at the heart of every hospice operation and are valued greatly.

How Hospice Volunteers Serve

Supporting Patients This is a huge part of what hospice volunteers do. These tasks can include: visiting with patients, reading, taking walks, helping communicate for patients, bringing in therapeutic items, or supervising therapeutic visits. This list is not all-encompassing, and volunteers can do so much more for the patients they work with. Comforting Family Members Volunteers can do anything from listening to family members, sitting with them, or helping them with simple tasks like running errands or taking care of family pets. They are also able to help family members have some time alone by sitting with patients while family members take a nap or walk. Fundraising and Administrative Work Volunteers can also help hospice organizations by using their skills in the office with administrative duties. Fundraising efforts can include helping with mailings, contacting donors, facilitating events or writing thank-you letters. Special Skills and Interests In addition to everything listed above, each volunteer has their own set of skills or interests that could be of use to the hospice they are volunteering for. This could include skills such as: landscaping, musicians, barbers, notaries, sewing, etc. If you feel that your local hospice could benefit from a skill you enjoy, reach out!   If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering with Hospice of North Alabama, please reach out by contacting one of our offices near you today.

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